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Elon Musk issues stark warning regarding AI’s threat in U.S. Senate gathering

Elon Musk of Tesla and X, Mark Zuckerberg of Meta, Sam Altman of OpenAI, and others met with U.S. lawmakers on Wednesday

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Elon Musk issues stark warning regarding AI’s threat in U.S. Senate gathering

Elon Musk of Tesla and X, Mark Zuckerberg of Meta, Sam Altman of OpenAI, and others met with U.S. lawmakers on Wednesday

Elon Musk issues stark warning regarding AI’s threat in U.S. Senate gathering
Elon Musk issues stark warning regarding AI’s threat in U.S. Senate gathering 

Elon Musk, the CEO of Space X and Tesla giant has called on Wednesday for a U.S. "referee" for artificial intelligence after the Meta Platforms CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai, and other tech CEOs met with lawmakers at Capitol Hill to discuss AI regulation.

Legislators are actively exploring strategies to minimize the risks associated with the burgeoning technology, which has experienced significant growth in both investment and consumer adoption following the introduction of OpenAI's ChatGPT chatbot.

Musk stated that the presence of a regulatory authority is necessary to guarantee the safe utilization of AI.

Musk informed correspondents "It's important for us to have a referee."

The billionaire, who also owns the social media platform X, added that a regulator would "ensure that companies take actions that are safe and in the interest of the general public."

Musk further added in a meeting that a "service to humanity" and stated it "may go down in history as very important to the future of civilization."

The angel investor affirmed that he had dubbed AI "a double-edged sword" at the conference.

Zuckerberg expressed that Congress "should engage with AI to support innovation and safeguards. This is an emerging technology, there are important equities to balance here, and the government is ultimately responsible for that." He added it was "better that the standard is set by American companies that can work with our government to shape these models on important issues."

Over 60 senators participated. AI regulation, lawmakers asserted, was universally agreed upon.

Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, IBM CEO Arvind Krishna, former Microsoft CEO Bill Gates, and AFL-CIO labor federation President Liz Shuler were among those who present at the event.

Schumer underlined the importance of regulating ahead of the 2024 general election in the United States, particularly with regard to deep fakes.

He said, "A lot of things that have to be done, but that one has a quicker timetable maybe than some of the others.”

Musk and a group of AI scientists and businesspeople advocated for a six-month moratorium on creating systems more powerful than OpenAI's GPT-4 in March, citing possible societal hazards.

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